Archive for February, 2011

Non-Toxic Wood Play Structre

Here is yet another great application for TimberSIL® wood, a children’s play structure. TimberSIL® wood is the perfect choice for this type of structure, being that it is the only non-toxic preserved wood resistant to rot and insects. Here with TimberSIL® wood used instead of conventional pressure treated wood, parents won’t have to worry about toxic chemicals rubbing off, leaching out and potentially harming their children.

TimberSIL wood kids play structure

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)
This site includes information on a petition from the Environmental Working Group and the Healthy Building Network to ban arsenic-treated wood in children’s playground equipment.

Advertisements

Olive View UCLA Medical Center

Sylmar, CA
A great deal of Class-A fire retardant TimberSIL glass-wood was used on the new Olive View UCLA Medical Center. TimberSIL is the only EPA approved non-toxic preserved wood product with a Class-A fire rating (TimberSIL also resists insects and rot). The Sayre Fire, also known as the Sylmar Fire, in November 2008, resulted in the loss of 489 residences in Los Angeles. Sylmar is designated as one of California’s many high fire zones and requires all structures to be built with Class-A fire retardant building materials.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Olive View-UCLA Medical Center is a hospital located in the Sylmar neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. It is one of the primary health care delivery systems in the north San Fernando Valley. The hospital was founded in 1920 as a tuberculosis (TB) sanatorium. In 1962, Olive View Hospital performed the first open heart surgery successfully in the San Fernando Valley, and one of the first in Southern California. Unfortunately, damage during the 1971 San Fernando earthquake included the collapse of structures at Olive View Hospital. The rebuilt Olive View UCLA Medical Center was opened in 1987.

The 2008 Sayre Fire caused damage to several outbuildings, and an evacuation of the intensive care patients from the hospital. The hospital is currently undergoing a major rebuilding project, replacing most of the existing facility with a new, state-of-the-art medical center offering optimal inpatient facilities, and the newly opened 16,000-square-foot Emergency Center.

Contractor: http://www.larrabureframing.com/
Architect: http://www.gkkworks.com/